Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Vorticity0123

Super Typhoon Haiyan

202 posts in this topic

iCyclone just posted this on FB..

 

First off, Tacloban City is devastated. The city is a horrid landscape of smashed buildings and completely defoliated trees, with widespread looting and unclaimed bodies decaying in the open air. The typhoon moved fast and didn't last long-- only a few hours-- but it struck the city with absolutely terrifying ferocity. At the height of the storm, as the wind rose to a scream, as windows exploded and as our solid-concrete downtown hotel trembled from the impact of flying debris, as pictures blew off the walls and as children became hysterical, a tremendous storm surge swept the entire downtown. Waterfront blocks were reduced to heaps of rubble. In our hotel, trapped first-floor guests smashed the windows of their rooms to keep from drowning and screamed for help, and we had to drop our cameras and pull them out on mattresses and physically carry the elderly and disabled to the second floor. Mark's leg was ripped open by a piece of debris and he'll require surgery. The city has no communication with the outside world. The hospitals are overflowing with the critically injured. The surrounding communities are mowed down. After a bleak night in a hot, pitch-black, trashed hotel, James, Mark, and I managed to get out of the city on a military chopper and get to Cebu via a C-130-- sitting next to corpses in body bags. Meteorologically, Super Typhoon HAIYAN was fascinating; from a human-interest standpoint, it was utterly ghastly. It's been difficult to process.

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do hope folks like James Reynolds are ok, nothing on Twitter since the storm arrivedProbably due to lost power / phone signal This does not look good, as the death toll rises http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24878801 Tacloban got hit very hard

just seen a tweet looks like he is ok and other too that where with him,they have been taken to the city of cebu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

iCyclone just posted this on FB..

 

First off, Tacloban City is devastated. The city is a horrid landscape of smashed buildings and completely defoliated trees, with widespread looting and unclaimed bodies decaying in the open air. The typhoon moved fast and didn't last long-- only a few hours-- but it struck the city with absolutely terrifying ferocity. At the height of the storm, as the wind rose to a scream, as windows exploded and as our solid-concrete downtown hotel trembled from the impact of flying debris, as pictures blew off the walls and as children became hysterical, a tremendous storm surge swept the entire downtown. Waterfront blocks were reduced to heaps of rubble. In our hotel, trapped first-floor guests smashed the windows of their rooms to keep from drowning and screamed for help, and we had to drop our cameras and pull them out on mattresses and physically carry the elderly and disabled to the second floor. Mark's leg was ripped open by a piece of debris and he'll require surgery. The city has no communication with the outside world. The hospitals are overflowing with the critically injured. The surrounding communities are mowed down. After a bleak night in a hot, pitch-black, trashed hotel, James, Mark, and I managed to get out of the city on a military chopper and get to Cebu via a C-130-- sitting next to corpses in body bags. Meteorologically, Super Typhoon HAIYAN was fascinating; from a human-interest standpoint, it was utterly ghastly. It's been difficult to process.

Thanks for posting. I wasn't 'liking' the outcome, even if expected. Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tragic consequences of course:

 

Philippines: 'bodies in the streets', with many feared dead in typhoon Haiyan

 
Reports from worst-hit areas suggest the death toll will rise significantly as storm's passing reveals scale of damage
 
Posted Image
 
At least 100 people have died in the Philippines from the impact of super typhoon Haiyan, a senior government official said on Saturday.
 
Many bodies were lying in the streets of the central city of Tacloban, according to reports received by Captain John Andrews, deputy director general of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines. Andrews told the Associated Press the "reliable" information about the deaths was relayed to him by his staff in Tacloban, but communications with the capital Manila were only possible every few hours. Officials said most of the houses in Tacloban, a city of about 220,000 people, had been destroyed in a surge of flood water and high winds, according to Reuters. Before communications were cut on Friday, city officials had reported heavy flooding. Mobile phone networks, power lines and trees were toppled and most roads were cut off.
 
"Almost all houses were destroyed, many are totally damaged. Only a few are left standing, but with partial damage," said Major Rey Balido, a spokesman for the national disaster agency. Cabinet secretary Rene Almendras, a senior aide to President Benigno Aquino, said that the number of casualties could not be immediately determined, but that the figure was "probably in that range" given by Andrews. Government troops were helping recover bodies, he said. US marine Colonel Mike Wylie, who surveyed the situation in Tacloban in preparation for possible American assistance, said the damage to the runway at the seaside air terminal was significant, but military planes were still able to land with relief aid. "The storm surge came in fairly high and there is significant structural damage and trees blown over," he told the AP.
 
The Philippine television station GMA reported its news team saw 11 bodies, including that of a child, washed ashore on Friday and 20 more bodies at a pier in Tacloban hours after the typhoon ripped through the coastal city. At least 20 more bodies were taken to a church in nearby Palo town that was used as an evacuation centre but had to be abandoned when its roofs were blown away, the TV network reported. TV images showed howling winds peeling off tin roof sheets during heavy rain. Ferocious winds felled large branches and snapped coconut trees. A man was shown carrying the body of his six-year-old daughter, who drowned, and another image showed vehicles piled up in debris.
 
Posted Image
 
Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever to hit land, was leaving the Philippines behind on Saturday, having flattened houses, triggered landslides and floods and knocked out power and communications across a number of islands. More than 750,000 people were forced to flee their homes. The toll of death and damage is expected to rise sharply as rescue workers and soldiers reach areas cut off by the massive, fast-moving storm, now heading towards Vietnam. Authorities in 15 provinces in Vietnam started to call back boats and prepare for possible landslides. Nearly 300,000 people were moved to safer areas in two provinces alone – Da Nang and Quang Nam – according to the government's website. Forecasters said the storm was expected to pick up renewed strength over the South China Sea.
 
There were hopes the Philippines had avoided a worse disaster because the rapidly moving typhoon blew away before wreaking more damage, officials said. But because communications were severed, it was impossible to know the full extent of casualties and damage. Southern Leyte governor Roger Mercado said the typhoon ripped roofs off houses and triggered landslides that blocked roads. The dense clouds and heavy rains made the day seem almost as dark as night, he said. "When you're faced with such a scenario, you can only pray and pray and pray," Mercado told the Associated Press by telephone. He said mayors in the province had not called in to report any major damage. "I hope that means they were spared and not the other way around," he said. "My worst fear is there will be massive loss of lives and property."
 
Eduardo del Rosario, head of the disaster response agency, said the speed at which the typhoon sliced through the central islands helped prevent its 375-mile band of rain clouds dumping enough of their load to overflow waterways. Flooding from heavy rains is often the main cause of deaths from typhoons. "It has helped that the typhoon blew very fast in terms of preventing lots of casualties," regional military commander Lieutenant-general Roy Deveraturda said. He said the evacuation of so many villagers before the storm also saved many lives. As relief workers began assessing the damage, US secretary of state John Kerry said his country stood ready to help.
 
"Having so recently had my own visit to the Philippines prevented by another powerful storm, I know that these horrific acts of nature are a burden that you have wrestled with and courageously surmounted before. Your spirit is strong," Kerry said in a statement. Among the evacuees were thousands of residents of Bohol who had been camped in tents and other makeshift shelters since a magnitude-7.2 earthquake hit the island province last month. Relief workers said they were struggling to find ways to deliver food and other supplies, with roads blocked by landslides and fallen tree

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/09/philippines-bodies-streets-hundreds-feared-dead-typhoon-haiyan

 

http://youtu.be/e5uHqWC2eCk

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horrible to see how this is unfolding.

 

CNN reporting that a gust of 236mph was recorded, but didn't say where abouts. Their coverage of the storm has been awful, so I wouldn't bet on it.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some horendous footage on a local tv station

http://phnoy.com/abs-cbn-live-stream

Whenever I put that station on I just seem to get adverts that go on forever before i get bored and turn it off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

iCyclone just posted this on FB..

 

First off, Tacloban City is devastated. The city is a horrid landscape of smashed buildings ...

I emailed your quote to a friend. He came back with this. He does make a good point imho...

 

'Seems a bit ghoulish to me, their places on the chopper could have been used for someone who didn't choose to be there.

I can understand wanting to experience it though.'

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Detailed Imagery of Super Typhoon Haiyan's Eye

The Suomi NPP satellite captured an incredibly detailed infrared image of Super Typhoon Haiyan's eye as it orbited over the storm at approximately 05:25 UTC on November 7, 2013. The entirety of the storm is actually cut-off by this and the previous orbit. This situation would normally result in reduced satellite data quality at the edges of the sensor scan. However, the VIIRS instrument has minimal data quality degradation at the scan edges, resulting in such highly detailed images.

 

http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/MediaDetail2.php?MediaID=1453&MediaTypeID=1

post-12275-0-68220400-1383993005_thumb.p

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just read several tweets saying it's been confirmed that it was the strongest typhoon to make landfall in recorded history. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally think this storm was a BIG wake up call for the world...

 

Yeah America bang on about how they have "big" hurricanes and "horrendous" tornadoes... But this storm was the thumb of God... 

 

I think we need to show a bit more respect to our climate and mother nature, after all.. she is in power...

 

Did global warming  having an effect to this storm? Was it a one off? Can we expect even bigger ones? 

 

Time for science to kick in... But my thoughts are with the people effected and who have lost loved ones...

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed Surrey, Mother Nature is in charge and always has been. Us mere mortals have the capacity to get our priorities right for the natural world, both for human and non-humankind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haiyan has continued to weaken as it crosses the South China Sea (SCS). Winds are down to 100kts, cat 3 on the SS scale. The cause of the weakening is primarily down to cooler sea temps in the central and western parts of the SCS. Despite the weakening, Haiyan is still a major threat to Vietnam. Haiyan should make landfall as a cat 2 on the SS scale, but the angle of approach is the greatest concern. Haiyan is moving west-northwestwards but it forecast to turn northwest onto the coast of Vietnam. This motion brings the front right quadrant (northeast) onshore first, where the strongest winds and highest surge are. The shape of the coastline and the small area of the Gulf Of Tonkin is likely to worsen the storm surge as the storm approaches from the southeast. Despite Haiyan being weaker, it is still carrying the surge from when it was much stronger. This surge will likely bring dangerous flooding, especially when combined with the torrential rainfall.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haiyan has continued to weaken as it crosses the South China Sea (SCS). Winds are down to 100kts, cat 3 on the SS scale. The cause of the weakening is primarily down to cooler sea temps in the central and western parts of the SCS. Despite the weakening, Haiyan is still a major threat to Vietnam. Haiyan should make landfall as a cat 2 on the SS scale, but the angle of approach is the greatest concern. Haiyan is moving west-northwestwards but it forecast to turn northwest onto the coast of Vietnam. This motion brings the front right quadrant (northeast) onshore first, where the strongest winds and highest surge are. The shape of the coastline and the small area of the Gulf Of Tonkin is likely to worsen the storm surge as the storm approaches from the southeast. Despite Haiyan being weaker, it is still carrying the surge from when it was much stronger. This surge will likely bring dangerous flooding, especially when combined with the torrential rainfall.

 

Time for Vietnam to now batten down the hatches. Posted Image  However we view these events, they are both saddening and enthralling at the same time which is an odd emotion to have. Keep the content coming guys n gals as I'm learning more about the storm on here than via the other media outlets.Posted Image

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they r now saying a tropical storm will hit the same area on the Philippines on Tuesday bringing more rain and wind which isn't needed 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they r now saying a tropical storm will hit the same area on the Philippines on Tuesday bringing more rain and wind which isn't needed

There is another invest, 90W, well out to the east that is worth watching. Highly disorganised at present, and is only located a mere 2 degrees north of the equator so it is stuggling to spin, but once it gains some lattitude it could develop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1000? That is one devastating storm. My heart goes out for them. Posted Image

 

Too bad there is another one coming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It puts Sky News to shame. To think that they had 24-hour continuous coverage of the St. Jude gale in England and this devastation only got a mention after the event. At least CNN were on the ball with it, even if it's "only" 1,200 dead so far in the Phillipines. At least it wasn't a western country where lives are worth more...

 

Anyway, rant over, now some weather. Yaxian, on the southern tip of Hainan Island, is reporting 37 gust 59 knots at 2100Z as Haiyan to the southeast starts to make its presence felt. It will be a good station to keep an eye on as the storm gets closer, though it only reports every 3 hours. Sanhu Dao, well to the southeast, is reporting 35 gust 57 knots and pressure 990 hPa.

 

http://www.ogimet.com/cgi-bin/gsynop?lang=en&esc=2&nav=Yes&lat=15N&lon=110E&proy=orto&base=bluem&ano=2013&mes=11&day=9&hora=21&min=0&vwi=Wi

 

Sanya Airport (ZJSY) is another one to watch

http://www.ogimet.com/cgi-bin/gmetar?lang=en&esc=4&nav=Yes&lat=15N&lon=105E&proy=orto&base=bluem&ano=2013&mes=11&day=09&hora=22&min=00&vwi=Wi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fear that the death toll from Haiyan (Yolanda as named in the Philippines) will probably reach or exceed 10,000. We haven't heard much at all yet from eastern Samar which took the brunt of the first cat-5 landfall and probable 25-45 ft storm surges. While the damage in Tacloban is fairly well documented, areas south of there actually took the eyewall direct hit and those have not been reliably assessed. Also there were very strong landfalls on other islands and not all of them have been documented even partially yet. So be prepared to hear of some rather high casualty figures in days to come. Most of these areas were under evacuation notice but my perception (based partly on facebook pages) is that a fairly substantial percentage of people either didn't know of these orders at all, or ignored them thinking the storm was over-hyped or that it would miraculously swerve off course. None of the above happened, the storm was almost perfectly modelled from 48h in, and the sad thing is that almost nobody needed to perish, even in a relatively poor region, there was probably enough resources made available by the government in advance to move almost everyone in high risk areas to safer locations. The storm surge will prove to be the larger component in the casualty count, and it was entirely foreseeable that 20-30 foot storm surges would take place (some may have been higher). It will be interesting to learn whether the weather station at point of first landfall in Guiuan survived or managed to record any landfall data. From satellite imagery and radar, it appeared that there may have been a central pressure below 900 mb and winds in excess of 170 kt sustained and gusts of 220 kt associated with the northern eyewall. Tacloban was just outside that zone and probably had cat-3 wind conditions but of course a surge into the bay from a cat-5 centre. Even as far west as Panay there was major wind damage near the track, the roof of the airport at Roxas (where minimum pressure of 975 mb gives the impression of being 50 km north of the eyewall) was blown off and wind reports there are only consistent with cat-2 conditions.

 

There are no doubt going to be some catastrophic damage reports coming in during Sunday's daylight hours as relief efforts reach the worst-hit areas.

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.