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Isolated Frost

Snow and Ice in the Northern Hemisphere 2013/14

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Could someone post some pictures please.

 

Of what exactly?

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Just because deepest downtown Hertfordshire or Esex doesn't have it's customary 2" of slush for a morning doesn't mean there is no snow.

Just a few miles North, the Scottish Ski resorts have more snow than they can dig.

 

Nevis Range 31st Jan

Posted Image

 

Poma lift at Glenshee........needs digging out!!

 

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Have we reached maximum sea ice for the season yet or is it still growing?

There looks to be lots of ice around Eastern Canada, a positive anomaly for there?

I suppose the fact there hasn't been a post since early February just sums up the lack of interest this winter - last year this thread had daily posts!

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Sea ice is nearing the maximum, but still growing. It's currently in the bottom 4 years on record going by most measures. While there are some positive anomalies in eastern Canada, it's at or near record low coverage in the Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea, Barents Sea and Greenland Sea.

http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/

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Sea ice is nearing the maximum, but still growing. It's currently in the bottom 4 years on record going by most measures. While there are some positive anomalies in eastern Canada, it's at or near record low coverage in the Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea, Barents Sea and Greenland Sea.http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/

Thanks BFTV!

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Sea ice is nearing the maximum, but still growing. It's currently in the bottom 4 years on record going by most measures. While there are some positive anomalies in eastern Canada, it's at or near record low coverage in the Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea, Barents Sea and Greenland Sea.http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/

 

 

I'm surprised we have so little ice given the lack of high pressure and warm temperatures, indeed I would have thought the bottled up cold over the arctic this winter would have helped ice retention.

 

Last winter saw a healthy ice cover which lasted through the summer thanks to low heights over the poles.

 

Anyone give a reason why ice cover is so low.

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I'm surprised we have so little ice given the lack of high pressure and warm temperatures, indeed I would have thought the bottled up cold over the arctic this winter would have helped ice retention.

 

Last winter saw a healthy ice cover which lasted through the summer thanks to low heights over the poles.

 

Anyone give a reason why ice cover is so low.

 

The cold wasn't bottled up, the polar vortex spent the entire winter over North America while the arctic experienced well above average temperatures. 

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I'm surprised we have so little ice given the lack of high pressure and warm temperatures, indeed I would have thought the bottled up cold over the arctic this winter would have helped ice retention.

 

Last winter saw a healthy ice cover which lasted through the summer thanks to low heights over the poles.

 

Anyone give a reason why ice cover is so low.

 

 

The cold wasn't bottled up, the polar vortex spent the entire winter over North America while the arctic experienced well above average temperatures. 

 

 

It's a little more complicated than just that.

 

The shifted vortex certainly had an impact on the Arctic Basin temperatures, but it's the peripheral Arctic sea ice regions that are at record lows, which are often well away from the polar vortex anyway.

 

Temperatures have been well above average, as thetonynator has pointed out.

Posted Image

 

This has been relatively common in recent years, but usually two or so regions will be slightly below average, this year it was Hudson Bay (which completely freezes over each year anyway) and the Gulf of St Lawrence (which only ever produces about 300,000km2 at best). The blocking highs set up in such a way this year as to allow a relatively steady stream of mild southerly winds in across many important regions of the Arctic.

There was that strong ridge which brought record high temperatures to Alaska. This carried much warmth and southerly winds towards the Bering Strait area, holding back ice growth here.

Meanwhile, the blocking high to our far north east (around NW Russia) steered more southerly winds towards the Barents Sea and central Arctic, helping to push back sea ice and warm things up.

 

There could still be a shift in wind patterns that allow substantial growth (well, spreading of the ice) in the next 2 weeks, but time is beginning to run out.

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A stretched and displaced vortex this winter left some areas warmer (Spitzberg especially) and other areas colder but with a good possibility of a colder spring and summer again we should see the positive trend in multi sea ice, volume, area and extent continue with 2012 standing out as the anomaly rather than the trend or norm.

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I wonder what the NH snow cover is atm compared to recent years because looking at the NH charts, it does suggest we may see quite a snow cover retreat coming up compared to previous years so perhaps a record breaking low snow cover in Asia/Russia for March?

 

Meanwhile in the states and Canada, its the complete opposite to March 2012 with the PV just locked in place and look like gaining strength as we head into the weekend, eastern seaboard is going to get quite a late spring at this rate. 

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I wonder what the NH snow cover is atm compared to recent years because looking at the NH charts, it does suggest we may see quite a snow cover retreat coming up compared to previous years so perhaps a record breaking low snow cover in Asia/Russia for March?Meanwhile in the states and Canada, its the complete opposite to March 2012 with the PV just locked in place and look like gaining strength as we head into the weekend, eastern seaboard is going to get quite a late spring at this rate.

It looks like sea ice is still increasing, snow cover looks slightly higher than about a week ago - The Baltic States, Belarus and Ukraine were snowless then (see map on previous page).https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/ Edited by March Blizzard

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A stretched and displaced vortex this winter left some areas warmer (Spitzberg especially) and other areas colder but with a good possibility of a colder spring and summer again we should see the positive trend in multi sea ice, volume, area and extent continue with 2012 standing out as the anomaly rather than the trend or norm.

 

Almost the entire Arctic ocean has been well above average this winter, it is certainly one of the "mildest" Arctic winters on record. In fact, this winter has been so mild that we've gone from 2,000kmextra volum over 2012 in October, to almost the same volume in February.

Posted ImagePosted Image

 

What indications are there for a cool Spring and Summer this year?

 

If you can, please don't resort to your usual condescending tone and insults that you do when responding to me. An attempt at a mature discussion would be nice.

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I'm surprised how mild temperatures this winter have been over the arctic, given how low heights have dominated, I thought higher heights correlate with warmer temps and lower heights with lower temps. Is it a result of the position of the PV? Only NE Canadian arctic region benefitting from cold conditions???????

 

Also not sure I understand Cooling climate logic that a cold spring and summer is on the cards, won't the warmth help build higher heights helping to release cold down to the mid lattitudes..

 

Not sure what the warm conditions means for the rest of spring or summer - may it help generate high pressure and much northern blocking once we see the PV finally relent. Its surely only a matter of time it shifts and weakens considerably - it has been a beast this year, quite exceptional.

 

I was reading Philip Eden report in the times the other day and he said the PV is on the wane 2-3 weeks earlier than usual...

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I'm surprised how mild temperatures this winter have been over the arctic, given how low heights have dominated, I thought higher heights correlate with warmer temps and lower heights with lower temps. Is it a result of the position of the PV? Only NE Canadian arctic region benefitting from cold conditions???????

 

Also not sure I understand Cooling climate logic that a cold spring and summer is on the cards, won't the warmth help build higher heights helping to release cold down to the mid lattitudes..

 

Not sure what the warm conditions means for the rest of spring or summer - may it help generate high pressure and much northern blocking once we see the PV finally relent. Its surely only a matter of time it shifts and weakens considerably - it has been a beast this year, quite exceptional.

 

I was reading Philip Eden report in the times the other day and he said the PV is on the wane 2-3 weeks earlier than usual...

 

Very mild weather has persisted across Alaska and the Pacific side of the Arctic which consequently sent the PV chunk into Canada/America regions and any Southerlies on the Atlantic side of the Arctic will always raise temps way above normal.

 

It does look like we are heading into a positive NAO which will start to bottle the cold up into the higher latitudes and lower latitudes will start to warm up, it does look like Russia could see quite an early snow cover retreat, even compared to recent years. The one crumb of comfort is that the positive NAO should keep the Arctic cold so temperatures may eventually return to normal for the time of year?

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Very mild weather has persisted across Alaska and the Pacific side of the Arctic which consequently sent the PV chunk into Canada/America regions and any Southerlies on the Atlantic side of the Arctic will always raise temps way above normal.

 

It does look like we are heading into a positive NAO which will start to bottle the cold up into the higher latitudes and lower latitudes will start to warm up, it does look like Russia could see quite an early snow cover retreat, even compared to recent years. The one crumb of comfort is that the positive NAO should keep the Arctic cold so temperatures may eventually return to normal for the time of year?

 

 

I thought we have been locked in a positive NAO since December?

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I thought we have been locked in a positive NAO since December?

 

Not quite sure but if this was the case, then other weather factors obviously came into play e.g the reletively persistent WAA up to Alaska and any Southerly winds from the Atlantic keeping Arctic temperatures well above normal?

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Lots of attention was paid to the rapid build of snow cover over Siberia during September and early October last year, but this build up suddenly came to a grinding halt come the pivotal moment of mid October. 2012 saw a later start to the season for snow cover in Siberia but importantly there was a rapid build up during the mid-late October crucial period. The result two very different winters.

 

My eyes will be on what happens during the mid-late October period rather than Sept-early October.

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