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xmetman

Central England Website Update

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Hi

I’ve decided to give up on trying to get people to download my CET application and am calling it a day on freeware development – now its free web development instead!

The work I’ve done on the CET app won’t go to waste though as I now use it to generate data for the various graphs that I am now displaying on my web site:

http://www.centralenglandtemperature.co.uk/

They don’t have the functionality of the CET application but they are, in my opinion clear, informative and easy to use.

I'm sure you'll let me know what you think.

Bruce.

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Very nice, thanks for this smile.png

Just a suggestion, the overview panel at the bottom should go at the top, gives a more profession view on arriving.

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Very nice, thanks for this smile.png

Just a suggestion, the overview panel at the bottom should go at the top, gives a more profession view on arriving.

Yep, agreed it needs something as a header and that would work.

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The table of rolling monthly values from 1659 should be in there too.

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