Summer Sun

Weather in the general media (Newspaper features etc)

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So MetO have allegedly briefed the govt with a seasonal forecast that says there is a twice as much probability that the winter will be cold against mild and that they have used their new system that can spot cold spells.

Ok, coat goes back into wardrobe and central heating temp is turned down....

BFTP

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After see the MetO's probability charts for the spring months, I shall take these charts with a large pinch of salt!

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Apparently their new 'tool' has been used which can 'predict' changes in stratos hence 'see' cold spells coming. So let's see how this goes then.

I think the energy companies must have got hold of it early too with their massive price hikes

BFTP

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I honestly thought that the Met Office had stopped this due to their dire track record!

I would rather check out of the window first.

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I honestly thought that the Met Office had stopped this due to their dire track record!

I would rather check out of the window first.

Unfortunately, I can't think of a single organization whose track-record has been substantially better...In most cases, the 'alternatives' are even worse!

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personally take the mets forecasts than some of the payed weather companies and i'm 1 of those who uce to nock the met quite a bit. With all these whild speculation i think some1 from the met should put the record straight for the publick.

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So MetO have allegedly briefed the govt with a seasonal forecast that says there is a twice as much probability that the winter will be cold against mild and that they have used their new system that can spot cold spells.

Ok, coat goes back into wardrobe and central heating temp is turned down....

BFTP

Well the law of averages says they surely must get one seasonal forecast correct.Posted Image

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Well the law of averages says they surely must get one seasonal forecast correct.Posted Image

Or the could go down the Piers Corbyn route, and keep getting them wrong for ever!Posted Image

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Or the could go down the Piers Corbyn route, and keep getting them wrong for ever!Posted Image

He did forecast the snow on on the Alan tittymarsh show a few weeks ago and was correct .Posted Image

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He did forecast the snow on on the Alan tittymarsh show a few weeks ago and was correct .Posted Image

As they say: even a broken clock is right twice a day!

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As they say: even a broken clock is right twice a day!

Poor Piers, he's damned if he do and damned if he don't!

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Poor Piers, he's damned if he do and damned if he don't!

Not really. It's just that 9/10 of his 'forecasts' turn out wrong. Arguably, just like nearly everyone-else's...

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Not really. It's just that 9/10 of his 'forecasts' turn out wrong. Arguably, just like nearly everyone-else's...

Would you then agree that, in fact, all forecasters are damned if they do and damned if they don't? Posted Image

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Would you then agree that, in fact, all forecasters are damned if they do and damned if they don't? Posted Image

Still 'no' mate...If you compare GP's forecasts with PC's efforts you should be able to see what I mean: one is accompanied by good, scientific reasons and probabilities, whilst the other waffles on about 'Solar this' and 'Solar that', without ever justifying anything in terms of any established science...

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Still 'no' mate...If you compare GP's forecasts with PC's efforts you should be able to see what I mean: one is accompanied by good, scientific reasons and probabilities, whilst the other waffles on about 'Solar this' and 'Solar that', without ever justifying anything in terms of any established science...

And the 'science' still gets it wrong too? A long way to go for everyone yet but clearly advancements are being made..

BFTP

Edited by BLAST FROM THE PAST

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And the 'science' still gets it wrong? A long way to go for everyone yet.

BFTP

and so do you

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And the 'science' still gets it wrong? A long way to go for everyone yet.

BFTP

Indeed, Fred...the difference being that science works by making falsifiable predictions. And, for that to happen, 'forecasters' need to be open about their methods...There's nowt wrong with getting things wrong (or right) but repeatability and falsifiability, and not mystery, are the essence of good science...

Of course, however, with weather forecasting, getting it right more-often-than-not would be a good start?

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and so do you

Hence the everyone Geoff......dear me

BFTP

Indeed, Fred...the difference being that science works by making falsifiable predictions. And, for that to happen, 'forecasters' need to be open about their methods...There's nowt wrong with getting things wrong (or right) but repeatability and falsifiability, and not mystery, are the essence of good science...

Of course, however, with weather forecasting, getting it right more-often-than-not would be a good start?

Yes indeed Pete, hence the editing adding clearly advancements are being made

BFTP

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A media storm: Why the way we talk about the weather has changed forever

Predicting the weather is no longer a mug’s game - it’s a social one. David Kenny, the king of US weather forecasts talks to Geoffrey Macnab.

Superstorm Sandy is likely to be looked back at as the first major storm to hit the United States in the age of social media.

What has become apparent this week – as roofs are blown off houses, gigantic cranes are split apart and flooding hits New York – is that Twitter and Facebook, tablets and mobile devices, are helping to save lives. It is also clear that the level of meteorological information we now all have at our fingertips is infinitely more sophisticated than it has ever been before. This is the point of view pushed this week by David Kenny, chairman and chief executive of The Weather Company, which owns The Weather Channel. "We can't stop it," he says of freak weather, "but we can certainly get people to move more quickly."

With just a touch of smugness, Kenny explains that The Weather Company saw superstorm Sandy coming. It's all very well being able to communicate with more than 100 million Americans, but you need to make sure that you're not having any Michael Fish moments. (The BBC weatherman never quite lived down his blithe assurance to the nation 25 years ago that we didn't need to worry about storms a few hours before the worst gales in centuries hit the South of England.) "The story begins a week ago," Kenny says. The Weather Company's army of forecasters knew by then that the perfect storm was a very real possibility. They started issuing their first warnings. "By Friday, it was pretty clear we were right."

In 1987, the British public was relying primarily on BBC and ITV broadcasts about the "Great Storm". New Yorkers in 2012 have far more choice. Old media still plays its part. The flagship Weather Channel "goes into every home in America", Kenny says proudly. "We have many ways to get the message out." In the run up to Sandy, downloads of The Weather Company's apps on mobile devices shot up sharply. "People are preparing that, if they lose power, this is the way that they are going to be able to stay in touch."

During the superstrom, cable and satellite companies have agreed to allow The Weather Channel to be "live streamed" to mobile devices. Meanwhile, the firm has collaborated with Facebook on "My Friend's Weather", a service that allows friends and family affected by "breaking weather news" to see who's at risk and to alert them to the danger. Through Google, The Weather Channel's TV coverage has been available directly on YouTube. There are also the company's own weather sites, weather.com and weather underground. Meanwhile, Weather Channel savants are tweeting incessantly, warning America about every little quirk of the storm.

You can't blame Kenny for using Sandy to thrust weather forecasting in the digital era right in our faces. As he acknowledges, a big storm like this is just what is needed to put the company in the spotlight. The business, owned by NBC Universal and private-equity groups Bain Capital (co-founded by Mitt Romney and The Blackstone Group), isn't a charity bringing Americans forecasts out of a sense of public service. Then again, Kenny says the number of tornado-related deaths has "fallen precipitously" in the last two years. Weather forecasting saves lives – and it doesn't seem like a business you'd go into out of a cut-throat desire to make money.

Grumbling about the weather is one of Britain's favourite pastimes. Weather affects everyone. Alongside your health and your favourite football team, it's a staple of daily conversations the world over. Certain celebrities are known to be weather obsessives. (It's no surprise that Woody Allen frets about the elements and is constantly checking global forecasts.)

For neurotics and for those who simply like to have a good chat about high pressure, low pressure and precipitation, these are golden years. We have more raw data about the weather at our fingertips than at any other time in human history. "I don't know if it's a change in the human need but I do see a greater level of engagement in weather stories," Kenny says. Weather, Kenny says, is one of the most popular categories on smart phones. Half of all owners of smart phones check the weather on it every day. "The smart phone is also very connected with social networks which means that people are talking about the weather more and sharing it with each other. I think that conversation just naturally leads to more interest." The public is growing more aware of climate change. This, in turn, stimulates more conversation about weather patterns.

Of course, there is a huge difference between low-level murmuring on whether the sun is going to shine this weekend and the reaction to a huge storm like Superstorm Sandy convulsing the East Coast of the US on the eve of a presidential election.

Hurricane Sandy is bound to have an impact on everything from commerce to transportation, from insurance to the way people vote – or even if they're able to vote at all. The difference now is that the Americans are better prepared. But Kenny doesn't rub his hands with glee whenever a storm like Sandy comes along: "It's mixed feelings. There will be suffering from this. No one likes to see people lose their homes and businesses and communities facing real hardship. On the other hand, we live for the challenge of always having the best forecast… we feel tested and we feel we are rising well to the occasion."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/online/a-media-storm-why-the-way-we-talk-about-the-weather-has-changed-forever-8269766.html

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UK FACES ICY BLAST AS SANDY BLOWS IN SNOW

HURRICANE Sandy is set to trigger an Arctic blast in Britain this weekend, bringing bitter gales and snow.

The superstorm has caused a shift in weather systems, allowing freezing air from the North Pole to flood in.

The Met Office warned Scotland will get snow flurries today. North Wales, the Pennines and Cumbria face a dusting tomorrow on high ground.

It will be England’s second snowfall this autumn.

Spokesman Dan Williams said the rest of this month is expected to be colder than average.

He said: “The pattern for the next few days is looking quite unsettled with some strong winds expected from Friday, rain and the chance of thundery showers and hail.

"Clear skies mean temperatures will drop overnight. Over high ground there could be snow showers in Scotland

and parts of North Wales. It is looking like this into Saturday and Sunday.â€

Leon Brown, meteorologist at The Weather Channel, said Hurricane Sandy had reinforced high pressure, which was helping block our usual mild Atlantic flow.

Jonathan Powell, forecaster for Vantage Weather Services, said the rest of the month is likely to be hit by bitter winds, frosts and snowfall with unsettled weather until December.â€

The Met Office has forecast “slightly below average†temperatures until the end of January.

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/355619/UK-faces-icy-blast-as-Sandy-blows-in-snow

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Thunderstorms and gale-force winds set to batter Britain on this side of the Atlantic bringing strong seas and heavy rain

Thunderstorms, hail, and gale-force winds are set to batter Britain on this side of the Atlantic over the next few days.

Winds as strong as 55mph and intensifying heavy rainfall will hit swathes of the country while the remnants of Superstorm Sandy die a death across the other side of the ocean.

Blustery winds will be strong enough to cause rough seas - with waves already beginning to build in parts of southern England.

Forecasters predict a wintry flavour to the stormy weather with snow and wet sleet expected to fall this morning in northern England and Scotland.

http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2Axnsj5iR

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Thunderstorms and gale-force winds set to batter Britain on this side of the Atlantic bringing strong seas and heavy rain

Thunderstorms, hail, and gale-force winds are set to batter Britain on this side of the Atlantic over the next few days.

Winds as strong as 55mph and intensifying heavy rainfall will hit swathes of the country while the remnants of Superstorm Sandy die a death across the other side of the ocean.

Blustery winds will be strong enough to cause rough seas - with waves already beginning to build in parts of southern England.

Forecasters predict a wintry flavour to the stormy weather with snow and wet sleet expected to fall this morning in northern England and Scotland.

http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2Axnsj5iR

Wet sleet is a pain but you know, its nothing compared to that dry sleet we get so often.

Really wish tabloids would get people who know what they're talking about to write these articles, as opposed to the current crop of morons who so elegantly pull this boll....balls out of their backside.

SK

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Thunderstorms and gale-force winds set to batter Britain on this side of the Atlantic bringing strong seas and heavy rain

Thunderstorms, hail, and gale-force winds are set to batter Britain on this side of the Atlantic over the next few days.

Winds as strong as 55mph and intensifying heavy rainfall will hit swathes of the country while the remnants of Superstorm Sandy die a death across the other side of the ocean.

Blustery winds will be strong enough to cause rough seas - with waves already beginning to build in parts of southern England.

Forecasters predict a wintry flavour to the stormy weather with snow and wet sleet expected to fall this morning in northern England and Scotland.

http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2Axnsj5iR

I know it's only the Daily Mail but, how could Britain get battered on the other side of the Atlantic?

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