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Anti Boring Weather

Where Is The Driest Place In The Uk

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As i live in in a dry area and probably one of the driest places in the uk i want to know where is the driest place in the UK because even in dry areas such as cambridge and suffolk see more rain than me and obviously the north and west is wetter than the south and east. However in the summer the south east gets good thunderstorms from france and these can scoot up into east anglia too. But i am to far north and west for these storms but occaisonly i do catch one. I also live on very low ground so when a low pressure system comes in from the northwest ,west or southwest places such as luton and northampton get all the rain and it avoids me quite often, this is very frustrating now as i have an allotmant and it is parched.

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I believe St Osyth (near Clacton-on-Sea in Essex) is officially the driest place in Britain, receiving on average 507mm precipitation per annum

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You do live in a dry area of the country but still some way off the driest. Bedford sees around 584mm per year whilst St Osyth in Essex receives just 507mm and is I believe the driest place in the UK on average.

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Here is a link to the met office website. This is an excellent resolution map showing the long term averages for a wide range of different weather types. One slight criticism of it is there are no place names on it. I wonder if any computer buffs on here know any way that you could superimpose place names on so you would be able to see to the nearest few hundred metres exactly what rainfall, snowfall etc areas get.

http://www.metoffice.../ukmapavge.html

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Here is a link to the met office website. This is an excellent resolution map showing the long term averages for a wide range of different weather types. One slight criticism of it is there are no place names on it. I wonder if any computer buffs on here know any way that you could superimpose place names on so you would be able to see to the nearest few hundred metres exactly what rainfall, snowfall etc areas get.

http://www.metoffice.../ukmapavge.html

Interesting, I chose days of sleet / snow falling / Winter / then click between both sets of thirty years

Then I done Mean Max Temp / Summer. Quite a contrast between the 2 sets of 30 years.

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Lee Wick Farm, St Osyth has been identified in the ‘Guinness Book Of Records’ as the driest place in Britain with only 513 millimetres of rain per year. In 2007 a report recorded just 506.9 millimetres (19.96 inches) per year, averaged over a 40-year period.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Osyth

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My grandad's drinks cabinet.

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As i live in in a dry area and probably one of the driest places in the uk i want to know where is the driest place in the UK because even in dry areas such as cambridge and suffolk see more rain than me and obviously the north and west is wetter than the south and east. However in the summer the south east gets good thunderstorms from france and these can scoot up into east anglia too. But i am to far north and west for these storms but occaisonly i do catch one. I also live on very low ground so when a low pressure system comes in from the northwest ,west or southwest places such as luton and northampton get all the rain and it avoids me quite often, this is very frustrating now as i have an allotmant and it is parched.

very snowy area mind you, Southerly tracking lows very prone to frontal snow, my area is much less snowy (too far north) and generally wet, especially if wind comes from the NW with high pressure to the SW

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my area is not very snowy at all apart from last december, 5 inches of snow was the most ive seen in my life. Luton which is further south and much higher ground sees far more than i do and my only chance of snow is from frontal atttacks and sometimes they dont get as far north as me last year i got very very lucky. Normally im to far inland for snow showers to catch any.

plus i live out in the sticks and for some strange reason its much drier than in my local town whichis two miles up the road.

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I think the driest parts of the country are the essex and north kent coastlines somewhere like herne bay or gravesend. Coastal areas don't tend to catch the heavy convection of inland parts in the summer. These parts are also very sheltered from rain bearing weather fronts from the west and south west and low pressure doesn't often channel along the channel to deliver heavy rain/snow on its northern front to these parts. The exception to this is when frontal attacks come from the east particularly in the winter when they catch hefty snow showers off a warm north sea, or if low pressure decides to descend down the north sea and become unstuck over Holland bringing low cloud to east anglia and kent with associated rain and drizzle.

The city of london can't be far off being classed as the driest part of the UK neither.

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i was born in gravesend i must have brought that dry curse with me when i moved

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As above East Essex is the driest with levels of around 500mm. Anything less than this is regarded as semi arid.

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I remember that when I was introduced to UEA, we were told that Norwich was practically the driest place in the UK, but it isn't- it gets around 620mm per year. The discrepancy with the drier parts of Essex is probably down to exposure to the North Sea (from both north and east) and perhaps slightly greater proneness to intense downpours in the summer (certainly during the past three summers, when it has rained in Norwich it's often been pretty intense, including a few instances of the UEA campus being flooded last July).

Tyne and Wear/Durham and the Kingdom of Fife are almost as dry, with 650mm, albeit rather cloudier.

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bone dry here in Southend , Im sure Shoeburyness station has to be up there with the dryest, I do hope we get a wet May as Im sure a hosepipe ban will come into effect soon, dony know how ill manage on he allotment

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20 days without rain here now and the April total is currently 6.8mm!

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2mm down here on the coast this is really exceptional and suggesting this year looks a possible record breaker in a lot of places.

Looking at the MetO average charts we are about 5% of normal

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2007 had a very dry April in Eastbourne with only 1.6 mm rain, so this may become the driest April here as we have only 0.8mm so far.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/stationdata/eastbournedata.txt

JOYFUL beachgoers enjoy another glorious day in sun-kissed Britain yesterday in what could be the UK's driest April EVER.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/3544468/Beachgoers-enjoy-another-glorious-day-on-Easter-Sunday-in-what-could-be-the-driest-April-ever.html

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78mm here so far this month, so even though it's seemed dry recently, nothing worrying here....so far.

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78mm here so far this month, so even though it's seemed dry recently, nothing worrying here....so far.

Theres been just 81.2mm here so far this year.

Normally we'd have expected 177mm by this point. Most concerning though is that we've had just 10.8mm since February.

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Just 10.9 mm here so far this month and today will be the 21st consecutive rainless day if there's none by 0900 tomorrow.

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This year is very similar to 2007 almost identical in fact

2007 April Rainfall for Leigh on Sea was 0.8mm

2011 April Rainfall currently is 2.1mm

:lol: :lol:

Last year was almost Moonsoonal :rofl:

2003 413mm

2004 541mm

2005 473mm

2006 466mm

2007 452mm

2008 545mm

2009 597mm

2010 640mm

Average on those is 516mm so we run the driest pretty close but not quite ;)

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78mm here so far this month, so even though it's seemed dry recently, nothing worrying here....so far.

Yes finishing values over Cumbria will be fairly healthy - however, most of our rain came in the first few days and since the 6th we have seen very little, so the total belie what as a whole as been a very dry month with very few 'rain' days.

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can someone tell me the rainfall for this year in my location i cant find any stats

ive barely seen any rain since end of feb

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can someone tell me the rainfall for this year in my location i cant find any stats

http://www.weatherwise.org.uk/

YearlyRain.gif

PRECIPITATION (mm)

DEP. MAX DAYS OF RAIN

FROM OBS. OVER

YR MO TOTAL NORM DAY DATE .2 2 20

---------------------------------------------

11 1 44.5 5.7 11.2 7 18 7 0

11 2 46.5 10.6 10.2 19 14 8 0

11 3 3.6 -27.9 1.8 31 3 0 0

11 4 1.0 -37.0 1.0 5 1 0 0

http://www.weatherwise.org.uk/NOAAYR.TXT

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