Jump to content

Welcome To The Netweather Forum!

Sign In or Register for full access to the community - including the regional forums.

Photo

50 YEARS AGO - THE 1963 BIG FREEZE


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
123 replies to this topic

#21 NUT

NUT
  • Members
  • 1,826 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 21:10

Yes i remember that winter so well C.I was 14 at the time and it started for me with the arrival of the snow on Boxing day from the North as the High ridged right up into Greenland.

Frontal snow moved down the country in the Arctic flow on the eastern side of the block giving those further North a white Christmas and much of the UK was snow covered by Boxing night.

A good website detailing the daily synoptics,temps. and general weather for that whole winter here
http://myweb.tiscali...62-63/index.htm
good work by Mike Tullett there.

It was that winter that really got me into chart watching-i think i hardly missed a day where i would look at the BBC evening weather forecast-in black and white then of course and just simple lines(isobars)and fronts on the presentation map.
I recall many days either after school or weekends when a whole crowd of us would meet up for sledging,snowball fights,building igloos and ice football on frozen ponds-the latter was quite a challenge.lol.I wouldn`t suggest the walking on ice covered water now but after a while in that winter the ice was at least 6inches or more thick.
I started a weather diary on Jan 1st 1963 and recorded that the final bit of snow cover thawed on March 2nd and taking into account that the snow first fell on the 26th Dec 1962 that was 66days of continual cover.
Add on some really low maximum and minimum readings and it really was a remarkable winter.


The website seems to have been taken offline sadly.
John, Cumbernauld, Glasgow.

#22 pete tattum

pete tattum

    Backwards and Downwards!

  • Forum Team
  • 38,598 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 21:15

I remember Boxing Day: I spent the entire morning watching the dustbin (it had a black lid); as a result, I must have seen the very first flake that fell in Harrow!Posted Image

Pete

 

Non cogito ergo non sum; et, merda taurorum animus conturbit!

We go about our daily lives understanding almost nothing of the world. (Professor Stephen Hawking)

Views and opinions expressed in this or any other of my posts are my own.

 

 


#23 knocker

knocker
  • Members
  • 13,371 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 21:55

The website seems to have been taken offline sadly.


Seems to be still there.

"Insight must precede application."
281c81c43c615177db549fa1fb75da6a.jpeg


#24 johnholmes

johnholmes
  • Members
  • 31,131 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 22:11

The website seems to have been taken offline sadly.


still there as far as I can see-logged on a few minutes ago

I no longer have a web page

please take care with sunbathing-it can give problems years down the line with skin cancer as I discovered


#25 johnholmes

johnholmes
  • Members
  • 31,131 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 22:15

I have often posted on Net Wx about this so will not bore you with another lengthy post. I worked as a Met assistant at the time at RCAF Langar, SSE of Nottingham. On the base it had wonderful central heating so working in shirt sleeves and sleeping in not a lot with the window part open. Going home close to Chesterfield was something different, usually going to bed in whatever I had on plus hat, sometimes gloves, woolen socks and hot water bottle. Yes the ice on ALL the windows each morning inside became a feature.
I'll dig out the link to the weather data for Langar, in the Vale of Belvoir so at times recording the lowest temperatures in the UK.

Attached File  Langar 1962-3 winter in Word.doc   29.5KB   162 downloads

Edited by johnholmes, 22 December 2012 - 09:59 .


I no longer have a web page

please take care with sunbathing-it can give problems years down the line with skin cancer as I discovered


#26 phil nw.

phil nw.
  • Model Forum Host
  • 4,964 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 22:17

The website seems to have been taken offline sadly.


Yes as Knocker says the link seems ok NUT.
Try googling Mike Tullet 1962/3 winter-you should find it listed so you can try and click on the search result.Posted Image

Phil nw.

 

Veteran of the 1962/63 Winter when Snow lay for 66 days ---will we ever see its like again?.

 

 


#27 NUT

NUT
  • Members
  • 1,826 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 23:46

I'll have a look in the morning see if it's fixed. I keep getting a 404 message when I click on the link. Weird.
John, Cumbernauld, Glasgow.

#28 NUT

NUT
  • Members
  • 1,826 posts

Posted 22 December 2012 - 10:48

I googled and nothing. All it's linking me to is newsgroups/books. Maybe my ISP can't detect it or something who knows. I sure I been on that site before though. Odd
John, Cumbernauld, Glasgow.

#29 Coast

Coast

    Rider on the storm

  • Members
  • 33,294 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 08:40

and 50 years ago today:

Posted Image

http://en.wikipedia....nited_Kingdom

Posted Image

The sea froze at Minnis Bay near Margate:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Coast, 02 January 2013 - 08:56 .

SAAB Convertible

Posted Image

Now, you listen here:'e's not the Messiah,'e's a very naughty boy!
Views & opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own - but the voices made me do it


#30 Coast

Coast

    Rider on the storm

  • Members
  • 33,294 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:53

Found a great local (to me) site from John Flude who recalls all that went on in that cold Winter of 1962/63:

http://www.jflude.co...task=view&id=70

Some pictures and charts reproduced from his website:

Posted Image
Posted Image

This is the seafront on 29/12/62:

Posted Image

Here's my picture at a similar point, but looking down Terminus Road on 6/04/08:

Terminus Road, Eastbourne


There was a slight thaw on 05/01/63:

Posted Image

Here's an extract from John's weather diary regarding snow conditions in Eastbourne December 1962 - March 1963



26 December 1962 - Snow began in the afternoon at Eastbourne giving 150 mm snow depth.
27 December 1962 - Main roads being cleared of snow, others very icy. East Dean cut-off.
28 December 1962 - Intermittent slight snow all day.
29 December 1962 - Slight snow in morning with NE Force 3 wind. 1930 UTC blizzard with NE to E Force 9 gale.
30 December 1962 - Intermittent slight snow all day. Snow depth 300 - 375 mm with drifts to 1000 mm. East Dean Hill blocked.
31 December 1962 - Slight snow. Wind now NE to N Force2 or 3.
1 - 6 January 1963 - Slight snow showers. Snow remaining uncleared now very hard. Main roads clear. Snow being taken away and dumped in the sea.
6 - 13 January 1963 - Any snow not cleared now solid ice. Black ice on roads.
14 - 17 January 1963 - Moderate snow shower 1100 - 1200 UTC 16-01-1963. About 25 mm of fresh snow. 15/16-01-1963 wind N to NW bec E again Force 4.
18 January 1963 - Most main roads cleared, side roads being cleared. Large piles of snow along side roads up to 800 mm high.
19 January 1963 - Snow from 1200 to 1700 UTC blowing in E wind Force 6 - 8. 50 - 75 mm snow with drifts to 300 mm. Small heaps of ice at high water mark on Eastbourne beach with frozen sea water on beach groynes.
20 January 1963 - Freezing rain, ice pellets and snow from 1000 UTC. Soft snow on hard ice being blown in the wind. Freezing rain at 2300 UTC and evening. Glaze everywhere on all roads and pavements.
23 January 1963 - report in Daily Telegraph that a two mile stretch of sea was frozen off Eastbourne front about 30 m from the shoreline.
26 January 1963 - Slight thaw with temperature to +4°C.
28 January 1963 - Becoming cold again.
28 January - 24 February 1963 - Remaining below +2° to +3°C. Snow clear in Eastbourne town by 24-02-1963 but remaining on South Downs and in fields.
25 February 1963 - Temperatures becoming +5°C each day. Snow remaining on South Downs and in ditches until the first week of March 1963.
6 March 1963 - Temperature +12°C at 1500 UTC Eastbourne.


SAAB Convertible

Posted Image

Now, you listen here:'e's not the Messiah,'e's a very naughty boy!
Views & opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own - but the voices made me do it


#31 Coast

Coast

    Rider on the storm

  • Members
  • 33,294 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:25

More shots of Kent when the sea froze. This one is Whitstable in '63:

Posted Image

Herne Bay:

Posted Image

Margate Jetty:

Posted Image

SAAB Convertible

Posted Image

Now, you listen here:'e's not the Messiah,'e's a very naughty boy!
Views & opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own - but the voices made me do it


#32 Coast

Coast

    Rider on the storm

  • Members
  • 33,294 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:33

Frozen sea here too in '63, Southend:

Posted Image

Great Yarmouth:

Posted Image

Poole Harbour:

Posted Image

The Thames at Windsor:

Posted Image

SAAB Convertible

Posted Image

Now, you listen here:'e's not the Messiah,'e's a very naughty boy!
Views & opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own - but the voices made me do it


#33 Dorsetbred

Dorsetbred
  • Members
  • 2,506 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:45

I was only just wondering what the 63 winter like here in Dorset[was in Birmingham at time]The 78 snow was special,Was in Weymouth area at time

It was a lot like it has been described. The snow started Boxing day afternoon, and on it went. The roads were blocked, we had to take a sled to Parkstone to collect milk as the local roads (all hills) were not cleared.
The ice on the inside of the windows was amazing as it slowly worked it's way up the full length of the window, and dressing in bed was the norm.
The milk bottles (then glass 1pt) had milk "growing" out of the top.
The dustman didn't make it for weeks to collect the rubbish.
The snow I remember was blown up against our garden wall leaving a nice 3ft snowdrift for the kids to play in.
Once the snow stopped it was then a case of "How much ice?" as everything froze hard and deep. As much as my parents tried desperately to save the goldfish in the pond by placing sacks over open vents, making fresh breather holes every day, the pond over 2ft deep froze solid and eventually cracked the concrete base as it forced itself larger & larger. It took months to finally recover the frozen fish, and then repair the pond.

Cheers
"Dorsetbred"

Poole Current Conditions 


#34 Larger than average Hobo

Larger than average Hobo

    Rock of Ages

  • Members
  • 703 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:55

Sadly, i was just too young to remember any of it. I was only two and a half.

Dave O'Hara. Weather buff, webmaster, net entrepreneur and dazzling young urbanite.
North East Weather Forum

 


#35 cerneman

cerneman
  • Members
  • 2,120 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 13:31

It was a lot like it has been described. The snow started Boxing day afternoon, and on it went. The roads were blocked, we had to take a sled to Parkstone to collect milk as the local roads (all hills) were not cleared.
The ice on the inside of the windows was amazing as it slowly worked it's way up the full length of the window, and dressing in bed was the norm.
The milk bottles (then glass 1pt) had milk "growing" out of the top.
The dustman didn't make it for weeks to collect the rubbish.
The snow I remember was blown up against our garden wall leaving a nice 3ft snowdrift for the kids to play in.
Once the snow stopped it was then a case of "How much ice?" as everything froze hard and deep. As much as my parents tried desperately to save the goldfish in the pond by placing sacks over open vents, making fresh breather holes every day, the pond over 2ft deep froze solid and eventually cracked the concrete base as it forced itself larger & larger. It took months to finally recover the frozen fish, and then repair the pond.

Wonder how country would handle such conditions now? In theory should be much better equipped, could imagine schools be shut,but if conditions persisted more than few days, maybe have to get Schools etc up and running, Could help harden people up a little

Edited by cerneman, 02 January 2013 - 13:32 .

Cerne Valley home of the Giant of West Dorset

#36 Coast

Coast

    Rider on the storm

  • Members
  • 33,294 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 13:39

Wonder how country would handle such conditions now? In theory should be much better equipped


I think the problem would be that we haven't really had an event like '63 in many people's living memory and they may not be as prepared as they would like to think. Although as you say, the equipment to deal with snow and freezing condition's exists, I guess modern financial considerations and Health+ Safety legislation would strangle our ability to meet the onslaught of a 'Great Winter' such as 1963 now.

http://forum.netweat...r/page__st__100

Edited by Coast, 02 January 2013 - 13:44 .

SAAB Convertible

Posted Image

Now, you listen here:'e's not the Messiah,'e's a very naughty boy!
Views & opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own - but the voices made me do it


#37 cerneman

cerneman
  • Members
  • 2,120 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 13:57

I think the problem would be that we haven't really had an event like '63 in many people's living memory and they may not be as prepared as they would like to think. Although as you say, the equipment to deal with snow and freezing condition's exists, I guess modern financial considerations and Health+ Safety legislation would strangle our ability to meet the onslaught of a 'Great Winter' such as 1963 now.

http://forum.netweat...r/page__st__100

Health&safety rules would strangle attempts to carry on in such conditions, but if lasted more than few days sure people would adjust, If weeks of 47 or 62/63 type winters occurred Schools would surely need to keep going and services would need to adjust,,,,,,
Cerne Valley home of the Giant of West Dorset

#38 SparkleS

SparkleS
  • Members
  • 1,259 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 13:57

Thats just typical i missed it, i came along 10 years later!! Lol ;)
Leyland,Preston - 15 mile from Southport coast

http://www.spiritcharms.co.uk/ my spiritual community

Spiritual and Psychic Readings website http://www.spiritfreedom.co.uk

#39 Coast

Coast

    Rider on the storm

  • Members
  • 33,294 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 14:00

Health&safety rules would strangle attempts to carry on in such conditions, but if lasted more than few days sure people would adjust, If weeks of 47 or 62/63 type winters occurred Schools would surely need to keep going and services would need to adjust,,,,,,


I guess everyone would work from home on laptops! I'm not sure how many kids have access to the web (a very high percentage) but with a suitable VOIP type phone + cam and maybe portal connection, a lot of people don't need to travel anyway these days?

SAAB Convertible

Posted Image

Now, you listen here:'e's not the Messiah,'e's a very naughty boy!
Views & opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own - but the voices made me do it


#40 johnholmes

johnholmes
  • Members
  • 31,131 posts

Posted 02 January 2013 - 14:07

The country is totally different to the situation in either of the two winters mentioned.
We are now much more 'high tech', more reliant on transport systems to move most of our food, merchandise etc across fairly large distances. We no longer rely on coal and our gas and electricity supply industries now operate to a much finer boundary on the risk side.
Total chaos for the first few weeks I would imagine and probably a gradual ability to cope with a variety of shortages especially if it was a snowy and cloudy winter, as it was for many areas in 1947. 1963 was colder for longer but snow depths were generally less high and less frequent so that might make for a quicker adaptation of conditions. I for one would not want either, but then some of you have never seen a really serious winter!

I no longer have a web page

please take care with sunbathing-it can give problems years down the line with skin cancer as I discovered