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Why Do People Say Passing Away Instead Of Died?


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#1 knocker

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 23:48

I didn't want to put this in the other thread for obvious reasons but why passing away? People are born and then they die. They don't pass away. I think it has something to do with how we handle death.

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#2 mike Meehan

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:02

Obviously a very sensitive subject to some, especially the relatives who are left behind yet it happens to us all one day, so people use it to minimise hurting sensitive sensibilities = like when you have a dog put down, it is generally described as being 'put to sleep'.
As for death of humans the Salvation Army refer to it as being 'promoted to glory' - as for myself I rather like the expression of 'popping one's clogs.'

Not sure what will happen after that - I expect I will get bored out of my tiny sitting on a cloud for eternity even if they do give you a choice to move around and perhaps sit on a cu nim sometimes as a special treat - can't play a harp anyway. :)
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#3 Angelici Magiovinium

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:03

I didn't want to put this in the other thread for obvious reasons but why passing away? People are born and then they die. They don't pass away. I think it has something to do with how we handle death.


Pretty good explanation here...

When a person dies the phrase passed away' is often used to relate the news to other people. Saying that someone has passed away' is perhaps seen as a softer or more gentle way of saying that a person has died and is often just an alternative choice of words. However, sometimes passed' or passed away' is used in the sense that a person has passed on', which has a different meaning. Passed' in this respect conveys the belief that the deceased person has moved on to another state of existence: it advocates belief in some kind of life after death. Such a phrase acknowledges the death' of the body but the continuation of the non-physical element of a person; what is often referred to as the soul. In this respect, death is viewed as a stage or process rather than an ending. In the spiritual tradition, the term crossed over' is sometimes used to refer to people who have died, meaning that they have crossed over to the other side', the spiritual realm. Mediums often use the term in spirit' when referring to people to have passed.



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#4 jethro

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:11

Perhaps a corruption of the old term 'passed over'? When people died they were considered to have passed over into the spiritual world.

Edited by jethro, 25 January 2012 - 00:12 .
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#5 knocker

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:24

Not sure what will happen after that - I expect I will get bored out of my tiny sitting on a cloud for eternity even if they do give you a choice to move around and perhaps sit on a cu nim sometimes as a special treat - can't play a harp anyway. :)


Well you could contemplate the corruption in the West Midlands Police Mike. That should take a bit of time.. :)

Edited by weather ship, 25 January 2012 - 00:27 .

"We have before us a most grievious ordeal. Failure is not an option. We must learn how to run this Spaceship Earth for the good of all its inhabitants or we shall surely perish. And the first commandment shall be, 'Thou shalt not destroy thy life support system.'" -Robert Fontaine
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#6 knocker

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:29

Perhaps a corruption of the old term 'passed over'? When people died they were considered to have passed over into the spiritual world.


Actually Jethro this happened to me before death when I entered the NW forum. On a more serious note why are we still using it?

Edited by weather ship, 25 January 2012 - 00:48 .

"We have before us a most grievious ordeal. Failure is not an option. We must learn how to run this Spaceship Earth for the good of all its inhabitants or we shall surely perish. And the first commandment shall be, 'Thou shalt not destroy thy life support system.'" -Robert Fontaine
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#7 knocker

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:44

Pretty good explanation here...

When a person dies the phrase passed away' is often used to relate the news to other people. Saying that someone has passed away' is perhaps seen as a softer or more gentle way of saying that a person has died and is often just an alternative choice of words. However, sometimes passed' or passed away' is used in the sense that a person has passed on', which has a different meaning. Passed' in this respect conveys the belief that the deceased person has moved on to another state of existence: it advocates belief in some kind of life after death. Such a phrase acknowledges the death' of the body but the continuation of the non-physical element of a person; what is often referred to as the soul. In this respect, death is viewed as a stage or process rather than an ending. In the spiritual tradition, the term crossed over' is sometimes used to refer to people who have died, meaning that they have crossed over to the other side', the spiritual realm. Mediums often use the term in spirit' when referring to people to have passed.



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Y

Yes I accept that all (don't agree) that MK but when my wife died many years ago I had to ring her of her many friends with the news. To say she had passed on wouldn't have crossed my mind. It just needs a simple statement that she has died.

"We have before us a most grievious ordeal. Failure is not an option. We must learn how to run this Spaceship Earth for the good of all its inhabitants or we shall surely perish. And the first commandment shall be, 'Thou shalt not destroy thy life support system.'" -Robert Fontaine
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#8 bobbydog

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 00:53

apparently you're dead....
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#9 knocker

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 01:21

apparently you're dead....


Okay I get the point. I post no more.

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#10 suffolkboy_

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 01:22

The reason I wrote "passing away" is purely as a mark of respect. I think it's the most appropriate way of saying someone has died when it is recent. Obviously it is slightly different saying "In 1901 Queen Victoria Died".....for some reason doesn't seem disrespectful. Hmmmmm, I don't know. To me it's just what sounds
right...no hard, fast rule.
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#11 stewfox

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 01:33

I didn't want to put this in the other thread for obvious reasons but why passing away? People are born and then they die. They don't pass away. I think it has something to do with how we handle death.


Maybe just manners for some people ?

Sorry to hear you dad passed away or sorry to hear your dad is dead or had died . I think flowers and music re passed away

#12 knocker

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 01:38

The reason I wrote "passing away" is purely as a mark of respect. I think it's the most of saying someone has died when it is recent. Obviously it is slightly different saying "In 1901 Queen Victoria Died".....for some reason doesn't seem disrespectful. Hmmmmm, I don't know. To me it's just what sounds
right...no hard, fast rule.


I take your point and I'm not saying you are wrong but how does "passing away" make it a more appropriate way of saying someone has died? What exactly is an appropriate way?

Edited by weather ship, 25 January 2012 - 01:40 .

"We have before us a most grievious ordeal. Failure is not an option. We must learn how to run this Spaceship Earth for the good of all its inhabitants or we shall surely perish. And the first commandment shall be, 'Thou shalt not destroy thy life support system.'" -Robert Fontaine
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#13 mike Meehan

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 01:49

Well you could contemplate the corruption in the West Midlands Police Mike. That should take a bit of time.. :)

Nothing to do with me. Anyway if you believe in Karma nobody gets away with doing nasty things.
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#14 PersianPaladin

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 02:59

It's a tradition. Just a sensitive way of breaking bad news.

#15 Styx

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 04:13

There's not much difference between 'passed away' and 'died' imho, both sound like the end, zip, no more.

'passed on' on the other hand is different altogether, it can more easily be construed as a belief that the continuation of somesort of life happens after death.

Since you can't destroy energy, life does persist according to my view of things, so i think 'passed on' is the most appropriate term.

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#16 snow raven

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 09:39

I guess it's down to each person's individual preference as to how to pass the news to others that someone they knew has died. Personally, I think using 'passed away' is slightly more sensitive when giving the news to someone who wasn't expecting to hear it - it kind of softens the blow.

But as is the case, there is no right or wrong way with describing it!
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#17 Cakie

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 09:57

I think it is seen as a softer way of telling someone but I would prefer someone said they had died, just personal preference and the way I have been brought up just to say things as they are.
I also don't like the phrase "sorry for your loss", it was much nicer for people to say nice things about the person who had died and how they might miss them than almost avoid the fact they had gone. But this is just my humble opinion, each are entitled to their own
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#18 Lauren

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 10:10

It's just a nicer way of saying it is all. Think about what most pople would want to hear over the phone:

'Yeah, she's dead'

or

'I'm afraid she has passed away'.

Quite obvious i would have thought really.

#19 knocker

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 10:29

It's just a nicer way of saying it is all. Think about what most pople would want to hear over the phone:

'Yeah, she's dead'

or

'I'm afraid she has passed away'.

Quite obvious i would have thought really.


Put that way it is but you wouldn't say 'Yeah, she's dead', rather 'I'm sorry to say she died'. I also agree with Cakie that "sorry for your loss" is another meaningless phrase.

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#20 Lauren

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 10:31

Put that way it is but you wouldn't say 'Yeah, she's dead', rather 'I'm sorry to say she died'. I also agree with Cakie that "sorry for your loss" is another meaningless phrase.


Well, yes. I just can't see what the problem is with trying to make the idea of death a little less, well harsh.

It doesn't bother me how it's said, but i can certainly understand why for some 'passed away' may be a much nicer phrase to hear than 'dead'.