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Where Is The Driest Place In The Uk


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#1 Anti Boring Weather

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 20:22

As i live in in a dry area and probably one of the driest places in the uk i want to know where is the driest place in the UK because even in dry areas such as cambridge and suffolk see more rain than me and obviously the north and west is wetter than the south and east. However in the summer the south east gets good thunderstorms from france and these can scoot up into east anglia too. But i am to far north and west for these storms but occaisonly i do catch one. I also live on very low ground so when a low pressure system comes in from the northwest ,west or southwest places such as luton and northampton get all the rain and it avoids me quite often, this is very frustrating now as i have an allotmant and it is parched.

#2 AderynCoch

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 21:00

I believe St Osyth (near Clacton-on-Sea in Essex) is officially the driest place in Britain, receiving on average 507mm precipitation per annum

Edited by AderynCoch, 09 April 2011 - 21:25 .

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#3 windswept

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 21:01

You do live in a dry area of the country but still some way off the driest. Bedford sees around 584mm per year whilst St Osyth in Essex receives just 507mm and is I believe the driest place in the UK on average.

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#4 feb1991blizzard

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 21:49

Here is a link to the met office website. This is an excellent resolution map showing the long term averages for a wide range of different weather types. One slight criticism of it is there are no place names on it. I wonder if any computer buffs on here know any way that you could superimpose place names on so you would be able to see to the nearest few hundred metres exactly what rainfall, snowfall etc areas get.

http://www.metoffice.../ukmapavge.html

Edited by feb1991blizzard, 10 April 2011 - 00:07 .


#5 Biggin

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 06:19

Here is a link to the met office website. This is an excellent resolution map showing the long term averages for a wide range of different weather types. One slight criticism of it is there are no place names on it. I wonder if any computer buffs on here know any way that you could superimpose place names on so you would be able to see to the nearest few hundred metres exactly what rainfall, snowfall etc areas get.

http://www.metoffice.../ukmapavge.html


Interesting, I chose days of sleet / snow falling / Winter / then click between both sets of thirty years

Then I done Mean Max Temp / Summer. Quite a contrast between the 2 sets of 30 years.



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#6 Coast

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 06:43

Lee Wick Farm, St Osyth has been identified in the ‘Guinness Book Of Records’ as the driest place in Britain with only 513 millimetres of rain per year. In 2007 a report recorded just 506.9 millimetres (19.96 inches) per year, averaged over a 40-year period.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Osyth

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#7 Osbourne One-Nil

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 07:11

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#8 IrememberAtlantic252

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 07:42

As i live in in a dry area and probably one of the driest places in the uk i want to know where is the driest place in the UK because even in dry areas such as cambridge and suffolk see more rain than me and obviously the north and west is wetter than the south and east. However in the summer the south east gets good thunderstorms from france and these can scoot up into east anglia too. But i am to far north and west for these storms but occaisonly i do catch one. I also live on very low ground so when a low pressure system comes in from the northwest ,west or southwest places such as luton and northampton get all the rain and it avoids me quite often, this is very frustrating now as i have an allotmant and it is parched.



very snowy area mind you, Southerly tracking lows very prone to frontal snow, my area is much less snowy (too far north) and generally wet, especially if wind comes from the NW with high pressure to the SW

Edited by snow? norfolk n chance, 14 April 2011 - 07:43 .

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#9 Anti Boring Weather

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 11:15

my area is not very snowy at all apart from last december, 5 inches of snow was the most ive seen in my life. Luton which is further south and much higher ground sees far more than i do and my only chance of snow is from frontal atttacks and sometimes they dont get as far north as me last year i got very very lucky. Normally im to far inland for snow showers to catch any.

plus i live out in the sticks and for some strange reason its much drier than in my local town whichis two miles up the road.

#10 damianslaw

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 21:10

I think the driest parts of the country are the essex and north kent coastlines somewhere like herne bay or gravesend. Coastal areas don't tend to catch the heavy convection of inland parts in the summer. These parts are also very sheltered from rain bearing weather fronts from the west and south west and low pressure doesn't often channel along the channel to deliver heavy rain/snow on its northern front to these parts. The exception to this is when frontal attacks come from the east particularly in the winter when they catch hefty snow showers off a warm north sea, or if low pressure decides to descend down the north sea and become unstuck over Holland bringing low cloud to east anglia and kent with associated rain and drizzle.

The city of london can't be far off being classed as the driest part of the UK neither.

#11 Anti Boring Weather

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 21:17

i was born in gravesend i must have brought that dry curse with me when i moved

#12 Alex

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 07:56

As above East Essex is the driest with levels of around 500mm. Anything less than this is regarded as semi arid.

#13 Thundery wintry showers

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 10:32

I remember that when I was introduced to UEA, we were told that Norwich was practically the driest place in the UK, but it isn't- it gets around 620mm per year. The discrepancy with the drier parts of Essex is probably down to exposure to the North Sea (from both north and east) and perhaps slightly greater proneness to intense downpours in the summer (certainly during the past three summers, when it has rained in Norwich it's often been pretty intense, including a few instances of the UEA campus being flooded last July).

Tyne and Wear/Durham and the Kingdom of Fife are almost as dry, with 650mm, albeit rather cloudier.

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#14 scientist_uk

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 15:41

bone dry here in Southend , Im sure Shoeburyness station has to be up there with the dryest, I do hope we get a wet May as Im sure a hosepipe ban will come into effect soon, dony know how ill manage on he allotment

#15 Coast

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:36

20 days without rain here now and the April total is currently 6.8mm!

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#16 Dorsetbred

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:46

2mm down here on the coast this is really exceptional and suggesting this year looks a possible record breaker in a lot of places.
Looking at the MetO average charts we are about 5% of normal

Edited by Dorsetbred, 25 April 2011 - 07:52 .

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#17 Coast

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 08:08

2007 had a very dry April in Eastbourne with only 1.6 mm rain, so this may become the driest April here as we have only 0.8mm so far.

http://www.metoffice...tbournedata.txt

JOYFUL beachgoers enjoy another glorious day in sun-kissed Britain yesterday in what could be the UK's driest April EVER.


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#18 Osbourne One-Nil

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 12:03

78mm here so far this month, so even though it's seemed dry recently, nothing worrying here....so far.

#19 reef

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 12:10

78mm here so far this month, so even though it's seemed dry recently, nothing worrying here....so far.


Theres been just 81.2mm here so far this year.

Normally we'd have expected 177mm by this point. Most concerning though is that we've had just 10.8mm since February.

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February 2014: 6.6°C (+1.9°C)

March 2014: 7.7°C (+1.1°C)

April 2014: 10.2°C (+1.8°C)

May 2014: 12.8°C (+1.4°C)

June 2014: 14.8°C (+0.4°C)

 

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#20 Terminal Moraine

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 18:36

Just 10.9 mm here so far this month and today will be the 21st consecutive rainless day if there's none by 0900 tomorrow.
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